New Rajapack catalogue launched and it’s changing lives

September marks the launch of Rajapack UK’s new 312-page packaging catalogue. Inside will be over 280 brand new packaging solutions to ensure your products reach your customers safely, plus we’ll be including eco-friendly packaging alternatives to help your clients answer their customers’ growing demands for environmentally responsible packaging.

The catalogue is being delivered right now, so expect yours in the post any day. If you haven’t ordered from us before, click the banner below to request your free copy.

Request the new Rajapack catalogue

Choose eco-friendly packaging and together we can change lives

Along with fresh packaging ideas, the new catalogue also focuses on the belief that ‘Together we can change lives’. Built on two of Rajapack’s core values: environmental responsibility and supporting charitable causes, we’re launching an action programme for Women & the Environment.

Women and the Environment

By simply ordering from a selection of 12 eco-friendly products, our customers can help women across the globe. For every one of these products bought between September and February 2016, we’ll donate up to £3 to help fund five community projects around the world.

These projects help women living in countries such as Cuba, Togo, Mozambique, Myanmar and India, to grow their own produce and build better lives for themselves and their families.

As you order at rajapack.co.uk, you’ll see a running total of money raised, and the difference your order will make to women around the world.

You’ll find full details about this great Women & the Environment project in the new catalogue and on rajapack.co.uk, plus we’ll be publishing information and videos right here on the blog.

Maximise your sales with environmentally responsible packaging

With eco-friendly packaging fast becoming a key factor for your customers, over the coming months we’ll be posting a number of useful articles highlighting the best ways for your business to be environmentally responsible.

Plus, following the launch of RajaPrint, our online custom printing service and online chat, our live chat service to provide advice, we’ve been working on more tools that will make buying packaging online even easier. So keep an eye out for these new features on rajapack.co.uk

If you have any questions about any of the above, please give us a call on 0800 542 44 28.

Inside Rajapack: A history of the RAJA Group

In 1954, Rachel Marcovici and Janine Rocher laid the foundations for the international company that we now know as the RAJA group. What started as a two-woman company in struggling post-war France has grown into a multi-national packaging giant, with subsidiaries in 14 countries across Europe. As of 2015 they have an annual turnover of 440 million euros and employ 1600 people.

Do you know where the name ‘RAJA’ actually comes from? Or how many copies of the first ever Rajapack catalogue were printed?  To answer all this and more, we’ve taken a look at how Cartons RAJA grew into the RAJA Group, and how they spread its roots across Europe and into the UK.

Rachel Marcovici
1954
– Cartons RAJA, whose name come from an amalgamation of the first two letters of each founding member’s first name: RAchel and JAnine, begins life under the shadow of the Eiffel tower. Starting with just one shop, Cartons RAJA specialise in recycled cardboard boxes, as they are cheaper to buy than brand new ones.

Late 1950s – In a periodwhere France was still recovering from the World War 2, the low prices of these recycled cardboard boxes, coupled with the energy and entrepreneurial spirit of Rachel Marcovici, means RAJA Cartons quickly flourish. The company expand to include new product lines, have ten employees and boast a turnover of one million francs (around £14,640 in today’s pound sterling).Danielle Marcovici

1962 – Danièle Kapel-Marcovici (President-Director of RAJA in 2015), daughter of Rachel Marcovici, begins working as a sales rep for the company at the age of 16. She would go on to stay in that post for the next 10 years.

 Catalogue1975 – The catalogue era begins. Cartons RAJA’s advertising department release their first ever product catalogue; a 24 page, black and white brochure which highlights 365 products. 10 copies are printed.

1982 – Danièle Kapel-Marcovici becomes Managing Director of Cartons RAJA, stepping up from her role as Sales and Marketing Director which she had held for the previous 4 years. Over the next 10 years, she would optimise the operations of the entire company, structuring all activities around key strategic teams such as purchasing, catalogue sales, product marketing, accounts, logistics, IT and human resources.  Her work pays off as Cartons RAJA pioneer the direct selling of packaging materials.

1990 – Cartons RAJA drop the ‘Cartons’ from their name and rename themselves: RAJA.

1992 – The company’s turnover grew to 316 million francs (almost 5 times what it had been 10 years previously). They employ 190 people.Rajapack Website

1994 – 2000 – RAJA becomes an international company by developing subsidiaries in Holland and Germany as well as purchasing BINPAC in Belgium and AID-PACK in the UK.

AID-PACK, which will later become RAJAPACK UK, are specialists in strapping. When AID-PACK are purchased in 1998, they have sales of £2 million.

2001 – RAJA create their digital offering and continue to develop their multi-channel marketing and sales strategy with the creation of their first online store (www.raja.fr).

2002 – Rajapack UKremain a catalogue-sales focussed organisation but move into the digital space with the creation and launch of their own website.

 2003 – 2012 – European expansion continues with the creation of subsidiaries in Spain, Austria, Italy, the Czech Republic, Switzerland, Denmark and Sweden.

RAJA in Europe

2015 – RAJA purchase Morplan; a major player in the distance selling of supplies and equipment to the UK retail sector.

The story of the RAJA Group continues to grow and is led by the people who work here.

Our staff are determined to keep the company moving forward, providing quality service and packaging products to our customers. Because of this, our staff retention record is an enviable one. Recently, 9 of our staff, ranging from warehouse workers to the Head of Customer Marketing, were awarded for long service to the company of 10 years or more.

The values that RAJA Group was built upon; empowering women and sustainability, still apply today. The RAJA-Danièle Marcovici Foundation, created under the aegis of the Fondation de France in 2006, support community projects for women in France and around the world.

We also put a large focus on environmentally friendly packaging, just like RAJA Cartons did when they started selling second hand cardboard boxes to Parisians way back in 1954.

The RAJA Group has now been supplying packaging materials for customers at competitive prices for over 60 years, a fact that we are very proud of.  Our long history and heritage have taught us to always keep the customer at the forefront of everything we do.

Happy Particularly Preposterous Packaging Day!

Today is Particularly Preposterous Packaging Day. On this day, we celebrate some of the more silly and ludicrous packaging that has been delivered over the last 12 months.

Examples of preposterous packaging might include:

  • Over-packaging; when small items such as batteries are delivered in containers suitable for larger items such as desktop computers. They usually require a lot of bubble wrap of loose fill to secure the contents
  • Packaging with the wrong name on
  • Needless packaging; when products are wrapped but don’t need to be
  • Packaging with too much protection
  • Packaging with unusual translations from different languages.

Bad packaging can be funny to some, but for businesses who receive or deliver items in packaging that is completely inappropriate, it can be a strain on costs and customer relationships.

We’ve taken a look at some of the most preposterous packaging that might affect the relationship you have with your customers, and some ways to prevent these from happening:

Excessive Packaging

One of the most popular examples of preposterous packaging is when items are delivered in a box or container that is far too big for the product inside.

Excessive Packaging

Using excessive protective packaging (such as bubble wrap or loose fill) can often mean that a business is not being environmentally-responsible. There are different definitions of what exactly constitutes environmentally-friendly packaging, but one common theme across government and industry guidelines is that manufacturers should use no more than the minimum amount of packaging required to safely transport the goods inside.

Over-packaging can also be expensive for businesses, as using more materials than needed means spending more than is needed on packaging.

Ordering the right size box and correct amount of protection is easy, and there are simple tools available online that can help, such as Rajapack’s Box Selector.

Incorrect Branding

Effective packaging must properly convey what the box contains. In order for customers to trust a company they are buying from it is crucial that they get what they expected when they open and use the product.

Incorrect Branding

Packaging is a great way of strengthening the brand and separating your product from the others on the shelf.

If the majority of the packaging you use is transit, this may not be a big issue for you. A lot of transit packaging is single colour (such as brown or white cardboard) with little in the way of description on it. Using materials such as custom packaging tape can help to strengthen your brand and customer communication.

Unnecessary packaging

A good example of unnecessary packaging is when items are packaged individually, when they could have been grouped together. Avoiding this mistake reassures customers that your business considers the environmental impact of packaging and helps save you money.

Needless Packaging

It may be the case that bananas stay fresher for longer if they are individually wrapped, but businesses must be mindful that customers are more aware of their responsibilities to the environment. This can play a large role in who they choose to do business with; blatant over-packaging like this can be harmful to a company’s green reputation.

Packaging that is not user friendly

As well as protecting and securing the contents, packaging has to be user friendly, such as having no  jagged or sharp edges, and with clear  labels or handling instructions (such as ‘this way up’).Packaging is also not user friendly if the customer has difficulty getting to the products inside. A great example of this is when scissors are packed in Blister packs which require scissors to open.

Blister Packs

Customers want to buy from a company again if they are satisfied with both the product and the service they receive. Their experience of the product starts from the moment they receive the package, so it’s vital that they have a good experience when opening their product.

 Packaging that makes sense

Particularly Preposterous Packaging Day started out as a light-hearted look at some of the more ill-conceived packaging that customers receive. On a serious note though, customers do take note of the quality of packaging they receive, and this can affect future buying decisions around who they do business with. Packaging effects the decision regarding repeat purchase.

At Rajapack, we offer expert advice to our customers on the correct type of packaging they use to make sure that their packaging is fit for purpose.

Fit for purpose might include factors such as the size of container, strength of material and environmental impact of the packaging among others.

Packaging that is fit for purpose will save money, time and the environment, which will result in happy employees as well as customers. If you have any great examples of Particularly Preposterous Packaging, drop them in the comments box below!

 

The lessons we can learn from food packaging

Whether it be primary, secondary or transit packaging, there are some top tips that help businesses better market their products and strengthen their brand. One industry that is very good at this, is the food packaging industry.

Food packaging is vitally important: not only does it protect food during transportation, but it also helps sell the food. You can have the same two products in two different packages, and if one looks much nicer it is much more likely to sell more.

Food packaging

Food packaging can also help to encourage repeat business, making it easy for customers to find and select your product in a shop. Though take note, it might also deter potential buyers if they don’t feel it’s genuine. This excellent food packaging comparison shows the reality of misleading food packaging, where in many cases the food product looks nothing like what the packaging suggests.

The key to good food packaging is a marriage of several elements such as practicality, attractiveness to customers and the ability to protect the food, amongst others.

We asked some top food packaging experts what they think are the key lessons that we can all learn from their industry:

1) Be honest about the way the your product looks

Stoats food packaging

These designs for Stoats by Leeds based Robot Food feature a window through which the porridge oats can actually be seen. Using a window like this gives the customer an accurate depiction of what the product looks like before they buy; the appearance of the product is actually a factor in the decision to buy the product. If the customer is persuaded by the appearance of the food, they are less likely to be disappointed when the packaging is finally opened.

We sat down with Simon Forster from Robot Food to discuss their work for Stoats:

“For any brand with a limited marketing budget, it’s necessary for the packaging to tell the brand story and promote the product. This was the case for Stoats. Retaining enough from the previous design to make it easy for brand loyalists to understand, we injected a whole load of fun in a way that was true to the Stoats story. The new designs are eclectic, colourful and inviting to all ages. The naive illustration style feels homemade, almost as if the designs were created by the team at Stoats. The packaging has interest and brand tone of voice all over to keep you entertained while eating your breakfast.

It’s important to see the quality of the premixed porridges and the high content of fruit inclusion. The die cut windows show off the product in an engaging way that works with the design to create a morning scene, celebrating occasion. Natural cues are represented in the nature of the loose illustration, with wheat, fruit, birds and sky and further cues come from printing the card on the textured reverse and in the choice of fonts.”

This method of showing the food is recommended for organic products and other high quality luxury foods.

Sausages

2) Create packaging people want to keep

 Coke

Famous packages like the Kikkoman Soy Sauce bottle (designed by Kenji Ekuan) and the Coca-Cola bottle (created by Earl R. Dean) are not only iconic designs, but also collectors’ items within their own right. Both of these designs are often used as small vases for flowers, and the multi-use properties of packaging such as these will often influence a purchase/encourage a sale? Other industries that could adopt this approach include perfumers and shoe makers.

3) Be clear: communicate what the product is in a simple manner

 shopping‘Value’ product packaging design may not be that obviously exciting, but it is undeniably clear in its communication of what’s inside the package. The Tesco Everyday packaging by Rocket Design is clear, concise and effective: a customer quickly knows exactly what they are getting.

Some designs are not so clear, such as this infamous Fabuloso bottle: is it a fruit juice drink or a cleaning product?

Fabuloso

Answer: It’s a cleaning product.

 4) Always think about the environmental impact of your packaging
(because your customers do!)

Bananas

This packaging for bananas in Morrisons went viral – and for good reason too. They really didn’t need to be wrapped in so much plastic and the environmental impact of so much packaging could be enormous in the long run.

When designing food packaging, a designer needs to consider not only how the packaging will be used to transport and sell the product, but what happens to once it’s thrown away. A good starting point is to ask the following questions:

  • Are all of the parts of the packaging necessary?
  • Are there any more environmentally responsible alternatives?
  • Can the packaging be reused in any way?
  • Can all of the packaging be recycled?
  • Can some parts of the packaging be recycled and not others? If so, can these parts be separated easily?

5) Make it practical

Fruit drinks

It’s all well and good when packaging has a unique, eye-catching feature, but it still has to function well. These fruit inspired creations are not only exciting and eye-catching – they function exactly the same way as a normal juice carton:

For food packaging to be most effective, there should be a perfect marriage between aesthetics and use. An interesting looking package may be enough to tempt a customer into an initial purchase, but it’s the functionality that will keep them coming back. A great example of this is Heinz Ketchup bottles; according to ‘The Marketing Blog’, customers consumed 78% more ketchup after the bottle changed size and turned upside down.

ketchup

6) Make it easy to transport

One of the key features of packaging is its ability to be transported. If you cannot transport your product easily and effectively without the packaging being damaged, then you cannot expect to sell many products successfully.

Toblerone

Nothing packs together as easily as a box, but boxes do not always make the most interesting package designs, so if you’re going to use experimental packaging make sure that the way it will be transported is practical and cost-effective.

The Toblerone chocolate bar box was designed to resemble a Swiss mountain range, but is also easily transported and stacked by turning some bars upside down and interlocking them.

 In Summary

A customer’s first impression of your product is usually based on the packaging as it is the first thing they see, and that impression could dictate whether they become repeat customers or even brand advocates.  Ensuring that your packaging is both fit for purpose and effectively designed will encourage repeat sales.

Effective packaging delivers the brand message, builds lasting relationships and gives the customer insight into the contents and quality of the product.  Because the food industry is so competitive, brands have to stand out, whether that is conveyed by the design of their packaging or by showing the quality of the contents inside.

 

Creative Ideas for Tape

Packaging tape comes in many different varieties, ranging from industrial tape which secures heavy duty items, to custom printed tape which strengthens brand and design messages, and low-tack tape applied to windows for the building trade. At Rajapack, we feel that it’s one of the most versatile products on the market.

Packaging tape

Packaging tape is not usually the first material people think of when they think of craft materials, but it’s extremely versatile and can be used in many types of project in order to customise an item or strengthen the structure.

To discover some of the lesser known creative uses of packaging tape, we sat down with two talented craft bloggers: The Crafty Gentleman and The Makery to discuss the different ways that tape can give a new lease of life to items.

Washi Tape Coasters by The Crafty Gentleman Packaging tape on coasters

The Crafty Gentleman was set up by Mike as a way of publishing more craft projects for men. These days, The Crafty Gentleman covers anything and everything that is craft or DIY related. As Mike puts it in his own words: “I’ll try making anything!”

He told us:

“I’m really into DIY and crafts, so I use printed tape quite often – it’s such an easy way to add colour or pattern to a project. Aside from the obvious uses in gift wrapping, printed tape can be used in so many creative ways. For example, I’ve used it to make wall art, makeshift picture frames, greetings cards and loads more.

My most recent DIY project with tape was a set of handmade drinks coasters. Get the full tutorial over on my blog at The Crafty Gentleman. You’ll be amazed at how easy they are to make! All you need is some printed sticky tape, plus a cork ring and some sealant or PVA glue (all of this is easy to find at any good craft shop). The great thing is that you can choose any colour/design of printed tape you want, so you can really personalise it to your home.

Why did I use printed tape? Because it’s such an easy way to add a strong colour and sharp design. If I’d used paint, or even printed a design at home, I don’t think I’d have achieved the same bold and eye-catching effect. I made the coasters a month or so ago when I moved house and they’ve held up really well. Give it a go and see what you can create!”

You can find out how to make the coasters for yourself here.

Decorating Jars & Mini Bunting by The Makery

The Makery Online Shop is a haven of creative delights, with an ever-expanding array of beautiful, carefully-sourced fabrics, craft kits and materials. You can pop into The Makery shop in Bath, or buy your craft supplies online.

They told us:

“Printed tape is a wonderful thing! We love it here at The Makery, and we use it all day long, whether that’s sealing up pretty packages, making handmade cards or just decorating everyday objects.

You can easily use coloured or patterned tape to decorate old jars. Just cut some neat strips from your tape and wrap carefully around your jars, horizontally or vertically, to make a stripy pattern. You can spell out names or words, and you could even experiment with cutting little triangles or zig zag patterns. Try popping a tea light inside to illuminate your design!

Packaging tape creative

lovelyvintage.canalblog

You can easily make mini bunting from any sort of sticky tape, you’ll just need a few different tapes and a little bit of string or twine. Cut out a diamond shape from your tape, and fold it in half around the twine by sticking it to itself. Then carry on making triangles until the bunting is your desired length.

You can use this to decorate handmade cards, or as a mini crafty display. Try using different coloured or patterned sticky tape, to create a sequence in your bunting flags. You could also try making square or heart shaped flags for your bunting. “ 

Three other creative ways to use tape

1. Printed messages and labels

Unusual packaging tape

James Greenfield

 

With custom printed tape you can decorate things with a whole range of messages or labels, from “Happy Birthday” to more practical labels such as “Pasta” or “Pens”.

 

 

2. Build a spider web game for children

Creative Halloween ideas

Handsonaswegrow

Building a spider’s web for your children is so easy to do and it encourages hours of fun. Simply find a doorway or adjoining walls and create wacky patterns by stretching your printed tape across the gap. Your children will love how their living room turns into a scene from a story book.

 

 

3. Decorating candle holders

Craft candle designNot only will this spruce up some plain old candle holders, but using different colours will result in some fantastic light effects. Similarly, with patterned printed tape, you can achieve some great shadow effects.

 

 

Customise items of any size and shape

There are many different reasons for customising items, from businesses looking to strengthen their brand message, to individuals giving their possessions a refreshing make-over.  Printed tape offers a low cost, simple way for people to easily customise any item in many different ways.

 

Packaging for Weddings abroad

Packaging your wedding goods

With wedding season upon us, many brides-to-be will be finalising seating arrangements and writing their vows. Getting married can be one of life’s most memorable experiences, especially when you add the extra glamour of doing it abroad. But for everything to go as planned, you need to think about how you are going to send your dress, clothes and cake to your destination, or get those precious keepsakes back home again afterwards. At Rajapack, we know a thing or two about packaging, so follow our advice and your cake, flowers and dresses will arrive at the venue in perfect condition.

 How to pack wedding goods for a flight

Flying to your wedding destinationTransporting wedding goods to and from your destination can be tricky if you’re planning on saying “I do” with the sand between your toes. Despite any verbal or written agreement you might get from an airline prior to travel, there is no guarantee that they will accept anything in a garment bag, as it will exceed maximum carry-on dimensions.

To avoid check-in troubles, here’s what to do:

  1. Ensure you have a suitable carry-on suitcase, ideally with a hard-shell case.
  2. Use the right packaging materials: use large sheets of white tissue paper to separate layers in the dress and to fold any suits. Our tissue paper is made from 100% pure wood pulp, is unglazed and acid-free to guarantee no damage to delicate fabrics.
  3. Wrap the whole garment in high quality bubble wrap. We use air-retention technology in our bubble wrap to ensure maximum protection.

Top Tip: If you struggle to fit your dress into your suitcase, take it to a local wedding dress company who will be used to packing dresses. And if you can’t bring a steamer with you for your arrival, hang your dress up in the bathroom and blast the shower to steam up the room – this will naturally remove creases from the dress.

Sarah Cogan from Set Ready Garment Bags advises “After the dress has been packed in either a wedding bag or in another garment bag, it would be wise to place a protective layer of clothes on either side of the bag. If it needs to be folded in half to fit into a suitcase, an added layer of clothes within the fold will keep the dress from getting a major crease line.”

 How to send glass, china or crystal

Sending fragile good abroad

If you have friends or family joining you for your wedding abroad it’s important to package their gifts safely and securely, especially when sending breakable and expensive wedding gifts in the post. With the right packaging products, your gifts will be able to withstand even the most heavy-handed of postmen.

To avoid breakages, take a look at these handy tips:

  1. Wrap it up securely. Use our extra-cushioned bubble wrap and remember to secure it in place using masking tape. If you’re sending more than one item, it’s fine to use the same box, but wrap them up separately to avoid them knocking together.
  2. The box you use is really important, especially if you’re sending something big or heavy. Luckily, our toughest boxes can handle up to 500kg and are built to resist any kind of knocks or abrasions, thanks to the triple wall cardboard.
  3. Place your gift in the centre of the box and pack loose fill or rolled up kraft paper into any spaces to prevent it from moving around in transit.
  4. Seal up the box for extra security and add ‘Fragile’ tape around the parcel.

 How to deliver a wedding cake Sending your wedding cake abroad

The delicate cake is a big part of your wedding and it’s important to make sure that it stays in perfect condition. A squashed or collapsed cake can quickly spell disaster for unhappy brides. Wedding officiant Michael Motylinski of Blue Sky Ceremony, shares his story:

“I was delivering a three-tier cake, which I left in my car. 25 minutes later, when I got the cake from my car I barely made it five feet when the entire cake slid off the cake stand. The air-conditioning in my car had been blowing warm air and the cake and icing had melted.”

If you want to avoid the problems that Michael faced, follow these guidelines:

  1. Carefully consider the temperature to expect on your wedding day. Certain icings last longer at higher temperatures, so plan your cake around this.
  2. Before transporting a wedding cake, make sure it is set on a sturdy fibreboard or plywood base about ½ inch thick. Your cake shop should provide this or you can get your own from online suppliers.
  3. Remove any candles, toppers or decorations and if you have a tiered cake on pillars, it should be unassembled and each tier moved separately.
  4. A white box is generally used for a wedding cake, but standard cake boxes can prove flimsy, so opt for one of our double wall white boxes which come in a variety of sizes, for extra protection with a beautiful finish.

Top Tip: If you’re hiring a courier to deliver your cake, your secret weapon is the ingenious Tiltwatch packaging label. You simply stick a Tiltwatch label to the inside of your package and when it arrives, if the label has turned red, you will know that the parcel has been tilted.

With your wedding details planned, the extra spend on packaging and labels may seem unnecessary, but as Liz Coopersmith of Silver Charm Events says: “Many times, it’s worth it. It is better to have and not need, than it is to need and not have.” Carefully consider the intricate details of safe delivery and you can enjoy peace of mind on the day.

Be sure that your wedding goods will arrive safely so all you need to do is get to the altar! 

Finland Baby Boxes: Why Cardboard?

Shared 1 million times and read over 10 million times, the BBC’s blog about Finland’s baby boxes has become one of the most viewed blogs in the history of the BBC website. This unusual story about a long standing national tradition has grabbed public imagination and sparked discussions across the country.

Finland's Maternity Package

Image © Finnish Baby Box Ltd

BABIES AND BOXES

For the last 150 years, parents of new-born babies in Finland have been given a padded cardboard box that acts as a Moses basket for the first few weeks of their child’s life.

These boxes are provided by the Finnish state, but can be bought online from companies such as Finnish Baby Box.

Anssi Okkonnen, a founder of Finnish Baby Box, told us:

“The Finnish Baby Box is a great starter-kit to parenthood with a selection of high quality indoor and outdoor clothes that will help clothe the baby for the first 9 months, hygiene products such as nail clippers and bath thermometer, and the baby can sleep in the box too, as it comes with fitted mattress, sheets, duvet cover and a sleeping bag. The box is a safe and cozy place for the baby to sleep and it is surprisingly convenient when placed next to the parents bed – night feeding is easy and the baby is nearby but does not share the bed.”

The reason why this story is so popular though, seems to be the quirkiness of the material. Cribs and strollers are usually made from wood or robust plastic, not cardboard!

People don’t usually associate cardboard with being a suitable storage option for babies, which is incredible given its versatility, and the fact that we use it to ship other fragile items.

Statistics show that around 90% of packages sent every year are done so in cardboard packaging. That is an incredible percentage given the variety of goods and products that are being sent.

WHY CARDBOARD?

If parents in Finland have put their trust in cardboard boxes to accommodate their sleeping infants, why haven’t we?

First of all, it’s useful to look at the properties of the material. Cardboard doesn’t splinter or smash and is getting stronger and stronger, with new processes of manufacturing making boxes more durable and crush resistant than ever before. Companies such as ourselves offer extra strong triple-walled boxes, ideal for heavy or fragile goods which can support a weight up to 500kg – not that you’d need that for a baby!

What’s more, cardboard is not only a durable material, it is flexible too. A cardboard box can easily be adjusted to suit a particular size or shape.

Secondly, being manufactured with different layers of fluting, cardboard is an excellent insulator which is sure to keep babies warm in winter.

Thirdly, from an eco-friendly and environmental perspective, cardboard is one of the most sustainable packaging materials on the market, with many boxes being manufactured from recycled cardboard. Cardboard boxes can also be reused over and over again, to store items, move goods and of course, for growing families.

Many cardboard boxes also carry the Mobius Loop, a sign that they can be recycled, while some boxes are even manufactured to be biodegradable after use. This allows companies to adhere to green policies, and once a baby is old enough, parents can easily dispose of the box.

So it seems that Finland’s baby boxes are a real alternative to plastic cribs, strollers or Moses baskets; after all warmth, comfort and protection are the ideal conditions for any sleeping baby!

 MAKING IT PERSONAL

Inside the Baby Box

Image © Finnish Baby Box Ltd

With ‘personalisation’ seemingly the latest buzz term in packaging, cardboard boxes can easily be marked and personalised. For businesses, they can become an extra form of advertising to help strengthen a company’s brand, and overprinting allows them to add their own branding or bespoke design directly onto the cardboard.

It’s a material that can easily be personalised by parents to match their baby’s personality and character. They could have their own initials, name, birth sign or favourite picture on the box.

Cardboard boxes also make an ideal ‘keep sake’ or memory box for children, allowing them to store their most cherished items.

 

 BABY BOXES FOR BRITAIN – COULD IT WORK?

After reading the BBC article, we wondered why the baby boxes idea hasn’t yet been adopted in Britain. The benefits of cardboard are clear to see, so why shouldn’t we use it in the UK? We’ve run the numbers to see just how much it would cost the taxpayer in this country for the NHS to produce boxes for every new born baby.

Based on the most recent figures of baby births (taken from 2014), it would cost £6.5m to ‘box’ every baby in Britain. But if Finland, a country where temperatures can drop to -50°C, can trust cardboard boxes to protect their precious newborns, then there’s no reason why Britain couldn’t do the same.

Answering your Questions from the Edelivery Expo 2015

On the 25th and 26th of March, we were on location at the eDelivery Expo in Birmingham, showcasing our services and products, as well as answering questions from new and existing customers.

Business owners and other exhibition attendees wanted to know what we do that makes our service so expert and specialised, as well as how we can create packaging solutions for different sizes and types of businesses.

Rajapack at eDelivery Expo 2015

We’ve compiled a selection of our answers to our most frequently asked questions from the eDelivery Expo 2015:

Where do Rajapack sit in the packaging market?

As part of the Raja Group we are the no. 1 Packaging Supplier across Europe. We pride ourselves on delivering a high level of service and a quality product to ensure our customers come back to us time and time again.

What makes Rajapack unique vs our competitors?

  • We have the largest range of packaging items in stock and available for next day delivery
  • Next day delivery is available on orders placed before 4.30pm
  • We offer specific packaging advice and support across our entire range from our UK-based sales team.
  • We guarantee consistent product quality across the range, meaning customers can be 100% confident in their purchases every time they order.
  • Long term contracts are available for customers ordering large volumes of products, protecting them from ever changing fluctuations in raw material prices.
  • We run a user friendly website that includes intelligent tools such as Box Selector and Rajaprint to help customers make the right decision.
  • Dedicated account managers make packaging purchases easy and efficient for large volume customers.

What packaging solutions do Rajapack offer for specific requirements?

At Rajapack we understand that our customers have specific needs that may require more bespoke solutions. Despite having 3,500 products in our offering, we realise some customers want us to source products that are not currently in our range or they want their packaging to be personalised with their logo. Our team of packaging specialists work tirelessly to offer a range of bespoke solutions, such as our custom-packaging tape system, Rajaprint, and go the extra mile to meet the demands of our customer base.

What ways can Rajapack offer to increase customers brand recognition?

We have a range of products that can be customised with our customer’s branding and logo to allow their products to stand out from the crowd. An example of this is Rajaprint, one of the more recent additions to the Rajapack website.

What machines do Rajapack offer?

When it comes to protection packaging, we have a range of machines that suit almost all of our customer’s needs. We have paper, air and foam packaging machines. These machines are designed to save you time and money over traditional protective packaging options.

Can Rajapack visit the customer’s site to do a packaging audit?

Our packaging specialists show off their expertise best, when they talk directly over the phone or visit their customers in person. By finding out the specific packaging needs of their customers, our team can work closely with you to audit your requirements and find the right solution for your business.

What bespoke products can Rajapack source?

We offer a range of bespoke packaging products that can be sourced specifically for your company. We can customise cardboard and postal boxes, packaging tape, labels, and a range of bags such as gift, plastic and canvas.

These questions reinforce the trends that we are seeing in the packaging market this year, with personalisation and unique branding being at the forefront of our customer’s requirements. Many customers are looking to create tailored and personalised packaging solutions for their products, allowing them to be easily recognised and remembered.

For highlights of the eDelivery Expo 2015, head to www.edeliveryexpo.com.

Raja Group buys Distance Selling Company Morplan

The Raja Group are very happy to announce the purchase of the distance selling company, Morplan.

Morplan and Rajapack Logos

 Morplan is a major player in the distance selling of retail supplies and equipment for various sectors, including clothing, office supplies and retail equipment. They employ a staff of 120, offer a 500-page catalogue with over 5,000 products and have stores in three of Britain’s major cities (London, Glasgow and Bristol).  Morplan have a sales turnover of close to 25 million euros with an operating profit of 10%.

The Raja Group president, Danielle Kapel-Marcovici said of the acquisition;

“Morplan is a great fit in terms of our existing knowledge and expertise in the market place.  I am delighted to announce this 9th acquisition; it reinforces our position in the European business to business market and also complements our organic growth.”

The purchase of Morplan will allow the Raja Group to double its volume of business and improve its knowledge and skill base in the UK market in terms of products and customers. It will also facilitate rapid growth in sales for both companies.

Raja Group Building

This is yet another exciting development; the news of this takeover comes only a matter of weeks since we launched our innovative new online custom packaging-tape system, Rajaprint

Sorry to burst your bubble….

April Fools!

Product not available

We have a little confession to make to you. We haven’t really invented InfusionWrap. We apologise to anyone who got excited about the announcement and hope no one re-wrote their annual budgets around this fake product.

But if you can’t have a little fun on April Fools, then when can you?

Although a couple of patents were gained in America in the 90s for the invention of a scented bubble wrap, we can’t find any evidence that suggests that the product is in development…..or is even a possibility for that matter.

Can we sniff out an opportunity?

That last question got us thinking; if we take a look at the process of how bubble wrap is made, is there any way we can see of introducing a scent or lasting smell?

For those of you who aren’t too sure on how it is made, here is a short walk through of the process.

1)      Resin is melted into layers of film

Starting in the form of beads, polyethylene resin is melted down to create the transparent or translucent plastic that forms the bubble wrap. The layers have to be strong enough to properly protect packaged items, but thin enough to pop under the right amount of pressure.

2)      Two layers of film are placed together to create a bag

The bag is then filled with air to create a sack.

3)      The sack of air is then placed onto a giant vacuum roller

Bubble Wrap

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The air sack is placed on to a giant metal roller. The roller looks much like a beehive in the sense that it is covered in small, bubble-sized craters. These craters act as a vacuum which suck in all the air, creating the bubbles that we see in the finished wrap.

4)      The cooling plastic sheets bond together

With all the air from the sack now occupying these pockets, the cooling film sheets are left to bond together. The bubble wrap is then taken off of the roller in the form that it will be delivered to the customer.

We can see from this process that the only way of creating a scented version would be to fill the large sack with scented air. However, we couldn’t really guarantee that scent staying fresh for long periods. Most fragrances that last do so because they’re in liquid form.

Did bubble wrap just pop up one day?

Even though scented bubble wrap hasn’t been invented (yet), it is incredible to see just how far the product has come since it was invented in 1957 by Alfred Fielding and Marc Chavannes. In fact, bubble wrap was originally intended as a wacky new form of wallpaper!

The idea came about when the two fused two shower curtains together, trapping bubbles inside.

People really didn’t buy into it as wallpaper, but were much more interested in bubble wrap as an ingenious way of protecting their valuable packages.

From then, it has come on leaps and bounds, with our range of Rajabul, for example, available in more types than ever before.

Innovations in bubble wrap

Bubble Wrap’s versatility has led to the need to create different strengths of the wrap, as well as different materials for a range of protective packaging uses. Here are just a few examples the different kinds of wrap that you can buy today:

Antistatic Wrap: This dissipates surface charges and prevents the build-up of static charge, perfect for protecting sensitive electronics.

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Heavy Duty Wrap: Heavy duty bubble wrap offers triple layer protection, with layers of inner and outer film providing extra strength, ideal for larger products.

Recycled Wrap: Made from at least 15% recycled polythene and is fully recyclable after use. 

recycled-green-bubble-wrap_PDT04720
Blanket Wrap: Made from a tough but soft polythene sheet, the blanket wrap combines the protective qualities of bubble and the softness of a tissue layer that protects furniture and delicate surfaces from scratches and marks.

 

So, we’re sorry again for fooling you with InfusionWrap, but it is worth remembering how awesome bubble wrap can be!

Photo Credit- ‘Wrap‘ by Michael Pardo is licenced under CC by 2.0